Descendants of Richard Hanby

Generously contributed to the GHOTES Web site by Ann Blomquist


Descendants of Richard Hanby

Generation No. 1

1. RICHARD3 HANBY (RICHARD2, EDWARD1) was born c Sep 03, 1626 in Westminster, England, and died Bet. Aug 1682 - Mar 1682/83 in Northampton Co VA. He married (1) ELIZABETH GETHINGS Bef. Feb 28, 1649/50 in prob Northampton Co VA, daughter of MATTHEW GETHINGS and ELLENOR. She was born c 1629, and died Bet. 1650 - 1656 in Northampton Co VA. He married (2) MARY CHILCOTT c Aug 26, 1656 in Northampton Co VA, daughter of THOMAS? CHILCOTT and ALICE HOOKINGS. She was born c 1629 in Northampton Co VA, and died Bet. 1660 - 1665 in Northampton Co VA. He married (3) SUSANNAH c 1665 in prob Northampton Co VA, daughter of UNKNOWN. She was born Bet. 1632 - 1644, and died 1697 in Northampton Co VA.

Notes for RICHARD HANBY:
Richard Hanby was a son of Richard Hanby and his wife Margery. Richard was christened in 1626 at St. Margaret's Church, adjoining Westminster Abbey in London. He grew up in a large household of at least 9 children who were all christened at St. Margaret's.

In 1641, Lady Elizabeth Dale, widow of Sir Thomas Dale, bequeathed to young Richard some land in Shirley Hundred in the colony of VA. Richard quickly left England and headed for the new world. In 1642, Richard Hanby and Sarah Hanby arrived in the Virginia colony, a mere 35 years after the founding of Jamestown. Stephen Gill was granted 2500 acres in York Co VA for transporting 30 persons, among them Richard and Sarah. Richard would have been about 16 years old, too young to be married. So Sarah may have been a relative.

The journey across the Atlantic Ocean took between 2 and 4 months. Richard would have arrived in the new world at Jamestown, the community founded in 1607 and, in 1642, a thriving port and town. He would have then taken a boat from Jamestown over to the eastern shore of Virginia to claim his inheritance from Lady Dale.

Fortunately, Richard left a variety of records in Northampton County. In July 1648, his mother Margery Hamby in England directed Charles Franklin to deliver 35 head of cattle to Richard. In February 1649, Richard acknowledged that he had received the cattle. (Mackey, 373,374,397)

By February 28 1650, he was married to his first wife Elizabeth Gethings. They had one son William born about 1650. In the court records, Richard and Elizabeth were granted a certificate for 150 acres. No location was given. (Walczyk, 9) No other record has been found for this land, so perhaps Richard did not take up this tract because of Elizabeth's death.

In Feb 1651, Richard made an agreement with Andrew Jacob where Jacob gave "a good feather bed, a good cow and calf, one bolster, valance and a bed stand" as security for the loan of 1500 pounds of tobacco. And Jacob also promised to deliver to Hanby "one sufficient[ly] able man servant of the age of 17 years the youngest and 30 the oldest for the term of 5 years." If the servant were older than 20, the term of service would be 4 years. The witnesses to this record were Henry Walker and Wingate Baker. (Walczyk, 22)

On Mar 25 1651, Richard Hamby signed an oath of loyalty to the king. By April 1651, on behalf of William Shrimpton, Edward Douglas had delivered 32 head of cattle and 14 calves to Hanby. The court record states that the cattle had been at Mr. Littleton's, Mr. Walker's, Mr. Wilkins', Mrs. Moore's, Robert Warren's, George Smyth's, in the town fields, at Magattey Bay, and in the old plantation neck. This document was not recorded until August 1654. (Walczyk, 169)

In July 1651, Richard appeared in court to state that Hungal Baker deceased owed him 280 pounds of tobacco. The court ordered that Hanby be paid by the estate's executor. (Walczyk, 29) At the July 1654 Court, the "difference between Richard Hanby and Richard Hill is referred to the next Court." (Mackey, 40) It is not known what their difference was or how it was settled.

Besides owning cattle, Richard was also a shoemaker. In September 1654, Thomas Benthall stated to the Court that he had offered 4000 pounds of tobacco for a year's work as a shoemaker to Richard Hanby but that Hanby had refused to work for less than 5000 pounds. (Mackey, 232) In 1655, Richard Hanby was an appraiser of the estate of Peter Walker. (Mackey, 210, 211) And in August 1655, Richard's 5-year-old son William was given a cow by Matthew Gethings, probably William's grandfather.

Richard's first wife Elizabeth died between 1651 and 1656, leaving Richard with his young son William. In 1656, Richard married Mary Chilcott, a daughter of Thomas? Chilcott and Alice Hawkins. Alice had married (1) Benjamin Stratton, (2) Thomas(?) Chilcott, and (3) Henry Bagwell. Mary had 4 half-siblings: Thomas Stratton (born c1632), John B. Bagwell, Thomas Bagwell, and Rebecca Bagwell (bc1639). By Apr 1645, Mary was married to Richard Buckland, but in 1655, she petitioned the court for a divorce because he was living with Mary Russell and had a son by her.

On August 26, 1656, at the time of their marriage, Hanby signed an agreement which acknowledged that Mary owned her own property which was to remain hers for her life. Richard's son William was also named in the document. The witnesses were her half-brother Thomas Stratton, his wife Agnes Johnson Stratton, and William Melling.

In Sep 1657, Richard and Mary gave a cow to an Elizabeth Selve (Selby), daughter of Tobias Selve. This deed was recorded in Nov 1658. Perhaps they were Elizabeth's godparents or were related to Elizabeth.

In Dec 1657, Richard and Mary made a brief attempt at settling in Maryland. Richard "of ye province of Maryland" gave power of attorney to Mary's half-brother Thomas Stratton to collect any debts owed to Richard in Northampton Co. Richard and Mary filed a claim in MD for a land patent which stated that they had immigrated to Maryland. (Skordas, 204) Son William was included in the claim. However, they soon returned to Northampton Co in Virginia.
Even several years after their marriage, Mary and Richard Hanby continued to have problems with her first husband. In January 1658, the Hanbys and Richard Buckland signed an agreement stating that there would be no future legal actions between them and that the Hanbys were to keep all of her property.

About 1659-1664, Francis Payne (a free Negro) was contracted to build a house for Richard for 800 pounds of tobacco. But they must have had some disagreements or problems because Payne appeared before the Court stating that he had only received 400 pounds of tobacco. The Court ordered Hanby to post security and that Payne finish the house as soon as Hanby could get nails.

The building of a house is a curious event because Hanby did not own land yet. He was contracting to have a house built during the early 1660s but he did not purchase land until 1667. It is not known where Hanby and his family were living from 1650-1667.

Richard Hanby and Mary probably had 2 daughters before Mary's early death between 1660 and 1665. About 1665, Richard married (3) Susannah (surname unknown). Susannah had a sister, Elizabeth, who married (1) John Daniell (d1688) and (2) Thomas Harmanson (d1702).

In May 1667, Richard bought 200 acres from John and Esther Robins. Hanby was again identified as a shoemaker. This tract, which is numbered N41C by Whitelaw, is on the ocean side of the county and includes the present village of Oyster. In November 1667, Richard had his cattlemark registered with the court, "cropt and slit and a hole on the left ear and a slit in the right ear."

Richard appears in the Northampton Co tithable lists every year for the years 1662-1677 (lists for years 1669, 1670, 1672, 1673 are missing). His son William first appears with Richard in 1671 about age 21. Richard and William continued to be listed for 1674-1677. It makes sense that only Richard and William were listed through 1677 because the next son was born about 1666, too young to be taxable during these years.

In 1676, Northampton County men formed a Committee of Ten which drew up a list of grievances to be presented by their Burgesses to the Assembly. These concerns included creating a new vestry, making a list of tithables available upon request, making county records available, etc. Whitelaw lists Richard "Lamby" among the ten. However, no other record of any person named Lamby is found in any early Northampton Co records, so this author believes this person was actually Richard Hamby. Also on this committee was Thomas Harmanson who would be Richard's brother-in-law in a few years. Whitelaw wrote, "All of the ten signers were prominent in the county and some of them were on the Commission at the time."

Richard witnessed the will of John Margetts in Feb 1678. However, Margett did not die until late 1687. So, by the time Margetts' will was presented in court, Richard had died.

Richard died between Aug 1682 and Mar 1683 about age 57, leaving Susannah with 5 sons, ages 9 through 17. His eldest son William had left the area and his two daughters were married. In his will, Richard gave 50 acres to his son William who was living in NJ. He gave daughter Rebecca one cow and daughter Elizabeth a feather bed. He then left the remainder of his estate to his wife Susannah for her lifetime and, at her death, the remainder of his estate was to be divided equally between sons Daniel, Richard, and John. Son Richard was to have the "ancient plantation." The youngest sons Charles and Joseph were not named in the will. 

In August 1683, widow Susannah and William Scott, the husband of her step-daughter, petitioned the court for a judgement against the estate of Simon Thomas (deceased husband of her other step-daughter). Susannah was granted 650 pounds of tobacco and cask. Susannah lived until 1697 and at her death, the land was distributed to the sons.

At Richard's death, he left 6 living sons. All 5 of his younger sons died before the age of 50. Three of them died in 1710: Daniel, Richard, and Joseph. Just a decade later, John died in 1719, and Charles died in 1720.

Of additional interest is the history of Richard's 200 acre tract which he purchased in 1667. At Richard's death in 1683, son William received 50 acres with the remaining 150 acres to go to the next three elder sons later. Though William lived and died in Salem County NJ, he retained his 50 acre inheritance in Northampton County VA and even added 100 acres to it. At his death in 1702, he left 150 acres to his younger sons Daniel, William, and Richard. These 150 acres somehow reverted to William (c1690) because at his death in 1733, the tract was intact and passed to his son William (c1724), a great-grandson of Richard. This William died before 1751, but no mention is made of the Northampton County land in his will, so he probably sold the land prior to 1751. If the land was sold in the 1740s, it had been owned by the Hanby family for over 70 years.

At the death of Richard's widow Susannah in 1697, their 3 sons (Daniel, Richard, and John) received 50 acres each. In 1736, Richard's granddaughter Elenor Ellegood and her husband John deeded 100 acres to their son John saying "it was half of the 200 acres which John Robins had sold to Richard Hanby" in 1667, 70 years earlier (Whitelaw, 92). How did Elenor get this land? Her father John had received 50 acres in 1697 from his parents, but how did he get an additional 50 acres? John's older brother Richard (c1669-1710) died, leaving his widow Sarah and one daughter who died young. In 1710 shortly after Richard's death, widow Sarah appeared in court and declared that she "does deliver up all her right and title of the lands in question to John Hanby except her thirds or right of dower of the said lands..." There must have been some stipulation that the land remain in the family, so Richard's 50 acres reverted to his brother John. John died in 1719, so the 100 acres passed to his children. Of John's children: son William died in 1720 unmarried; daughter Ann married George Holt and it is not known why she did not receive any of this land. Thus daughter Elenor had 100 acres from her grandfather Richard Hanby through her father John Hanby.

Further study of deeds must be made to determine the ownership of the other 50 acres which was left to son Daniel. Daniel had only 2 daughters. The younger one, Elizabeth, married Thomas Parker, but both she and her husband were dead by 1724 and their only son John Parker died in 1735. So, it is not likely that the missing 50 acres passed through this part of the Hanby family. This researcher believes that the missing acres may have gone to Daniel's older daughter Susannah (who married Thomas Batson).

Unfortunately, the youngest Hanby sons, Charles (c1674) and Joseph (c1676) were left landless. It is ironic that the Hanby men who carried on the family name and remained in the home county inherited no land. By the late 1700s, all of the Hanby men in the county owned no land.


References
Bell, John B. Northampton County VA Tithables 1662-1677. p 4, 8, 12, 17, 23, 29, 35, 40, 44, 47, 56, 63, 69.
Walczyk, Frank. Cattle Marks of Northampton Co VA 1655-1742. p 8.
Filby. Passenger Lists, 1982-1985, p 1201.
Mackey, Howard and Marlene Groves. Northampton County VA Record Book Orders, Deeds, Wills, Etc., Vol 3 1645-1651. p 373, 374, 397.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton Co VA Orders, Deeds, & Wills, 1651-1654, Book IV. p 9, 22, 29, 134, 163, 169.
Mackey, Howard and Marlene Groves. Northampton County VA Record Book Orders, Deeds, Wills, Etc., Vol 5 1654-1655. p 40.
Marshall, James. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County VA 1632-1802. p 115.
Northampton Co VA Records:
Deed Bk 7 p 8, 9 p15, 16 p153, 16 p154.
Order Bk No. 8 p173
Nugent, Nellie. Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol 1, p 142.
Skordas, Gust. The Early Settlers of Maryland. p 204.
Whitelaw, Ralph. Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1989. p 35-36, 92, 117, 127, 183, 186, 201, 205.
Wise, Jennings. Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke, 1911. p 135.
Walczyk, Frank. Cattle Marks of Northampton County VA 1665-1742. p 8, 11, 15, 27, 31.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County VA Orders & Wills, Vol 1 1683-1689. p 13.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County VA Orders & Wills, Vol 2, 1686-1689. p 135.
Mackey, Howard and Marlene Groves. Northampton Co VA Record Book Deeds, Wills, Etc Volumes 6 and 7-8, 1655-1657. p 52, 71, 120, 235-236.
Theory that Richard's wife was Elizabeth Gethings originated with Duane Boggs, 2002.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.
This narrative is copyrighted material and may not be posted or published except by the author.


Notes for ELIZABETH GETHINGS:
What was Elizabeth's surname? Is there proof of her name? Elizabeth was not named with her Hanby name in any man's will. Since she died at a young age, it is possible that she died before her father, so she would not be named in her father's will. Unfortunately, her son William Hanby was also not named in any grandfather's will. 

In 2002, Duane Boggs of Cincinnati suggested that Elizabeth was a daughter of Matthew and Ellenor Gethings. After assembling the Gethings family and its recorded activities, this seems very reasonable to me. Elizabeth's marriage to Richard Hanby and the marriages of her siblings explains the relationships among otherwise unrelated people.

In 1650, the probable year of Elizabeth's marriage, the Gethings were probably living on the only recorded land they owned, N11 (Whitelaw's designation). One wonders how Elizabeth and Richard met. James Perry, in his excellent book about early Eastern Shore history, states that no horses were present on the Eastern Shore prior to 1642 and that even by 1650, there were only 6. The mode of transportation for people was by foot or by boat. Since transportation was difficult and there were no towns in early Virginia, most people only had contact with others living within a three mile radius. So, perhaps Richard was living within 3 miles of N11.

References
Perry, James R. The Formation of a Society on Virginia's Eastern Shore 1615-1655, 1990. p 42,120
Whitelaw, Ralph. Virginia's Eastern Shore.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist. 5/2002



Notes for MARY CHILCOTT:
Mary Chilcott has an interesting story in her own right. She was a child of her mother's second marriage. Alice Hookings had first married Benjamin Stratton, a much older man, in England. At his death, Alice was left with one young son. Alice and her parents seem to have emigrated to Virginia where she married Mr. Chilcott. His name is not certain but may have been Thomas because he is the only Chilcott of record in the area. Unfortunately, he died early, leaving Alice with one daughter, Mary. Alice married next Henry Bagwell, a prominent older resident of the county. They had 3 children, so Mary grew up in a household with 4 half-siblings: Thomas Stratton (born c1625), John B. Bagwell, Thomas Bagwell, and Rebecca Bagwell (bc1639).

By Apr 1645, Mary married Richard Buckland. It was the beginning of a ten year ordeal for her. Richard was constantly in trouble or causing trouble. Buckland was unable to be a faithful husband. In Oct 1647, Mary went to court complaining "that whereas she hath sustained much wrong not only of her said husband but also by Mary Russell (who keepeth company with the said Richard Buckland) insomuch that the said Mary Buckland is daily in fear of further wrongs that she may sustain by her husband & the said Mary Russell." The Court ordered that Buckland and Russell be taken into custody until they could provide security for their appearance in court and that they be "kept asunder and not accompany one another." (Mackey, Vol 3, 225)

Buckland didn't change his ways. In November 1648, Richard Bailey deposed to the court "That about the month of August this present year, the wife of Richard Buckland coming to milk at the pen where this deponent's wife did milk, Mary (the wife of Buckland) made complaint unto this deponent's wife that she could not live quietly for her cousin Mary Russell, and that her husband did abuse her perpetually and further she said that they did lodge together & in the morning Mary Buckland going to milking leaving her husband and Mary Russell lying upon a matt, her husband in his shirt & Mary in her smock." Because of previous court orders to behave properly which he had ignored, Buckland was sentenced to 20 lashes on the back. (Mackey, Vol 3, 309)

No orders by the court would control Buckland and by 1655, he was living with Mary Russell and had a son by her. Mary petitioned the court for a divorce and was finally granted one. This was definitely an unusual event and was only granted by the court in extreme circumstances. Fortunately, throughout her 10 years of marriage with Buckland, she did not seem to have any children with him.

Mary immediately married Richard Hanby, a widower with a young son. On August 26, 1656, at the time of their marriage, Hanby signed an agreement which acknowledged that Mary owned her own property which was to remain hers for her life. Richard's son William was also named in the document. The witnesses were her half-brother Thomas Stratton, his wife Agnes Johnson Stratton, and William Melling.

Mary bore Hanby two daughters and then died in her 30s between 1660 and 1665. She experienced 10 long years of tribulations with her first husband and had fewer than 9 years with her second. We can only hope that she was happy during her second marriage.

References
Mackey, Howard and Marlene Groves. Northampton Co VA Record Book, Vol 3 1645-1651. p 225, 309.
Researched and written by Ann Blomquist.
This narrative is copyrighted material and may not be posted or published except by the author.

Child of RICHARD HANBY and ELIZABETH GETHINGS is:
i. WILLIAM4 HANBY, b. c 1650, Northampton Co VA; d. 1702, Salem Co NJ; m. JEAN, c 1674, VA/NJ/PA; b. c 1658; d. Aft. 1702.

Notes for WILLIAM HANBY:
William Hanby was a son of Richard Hanby and his first wife Elizabeth Gethings. He was born in Northampton Co VA and grew up there. William's mother died shortly after his birth and his father married Mary Chilcott when William was about 5 years old. Mary would have raised William during his early childhood. However, Mary probably died 1660-1665 and his father married Susannah. Richard and Susannah had 5 sons, so William had 7 half-siblings.

On Jul 20 1655, William was given a cow by Mathew Gethings, probably his grandfather.

Beginning in 1671, William was included with his father's listing in the Northampton Co tithables. This confirms William's age because he would have been about 21 in 1671, old enough to be taxed. William continued to appear with his father through 1677.

About 1674 at age 24, William married Jean (surname unknown). It is not known where they married, it could have been VA, NJ, or PA. They had at least one daughter and 4 sons, the sons all given Hanby family names. William was listed in Northampton County through 1677.

In Oct 1682 when his sister's husband Simon Thomas died, William was given Thomas' estate if Thomas' son who was in England did not claim it within 12 years. However, in 1720, this bequest went to this William's nephew, another William Hanby, son of John Hanby and Mary Mulls.

In 1683 when his father died in Northampton Co VA, William was given 50 acres at the west end of the family tract. In March 1685, William was granted a "nonsuit" in the matter brought by Richard Cripps because the matter was "not entered according to law." (Walczyk, 1683-1689, p102).

A few months later in June 1685, William had the following notice recorded at court: "To all whom it may concern, These are to give notice that William Hanby of this county is forthwith intended (by God's permission) to go for Pennsilvania if any person can justly claim anything of him, let them repair to the house of Charles Parkes and they shall be satisfied which at his instance is hereby signified this 3rd day of June anno 1685." (Walczyk, 1683-1689, p 118)

William must have delayed his departure somewhat. In July 1685, Hanby bought an unknown item at the estate sale of William Nicholls. In October 1685, William's name was included by Elizabeth Harman when she presented a list of expenses to the court retrieving John Welsh who ran away. Elizabeth paid William 100 pounds of tobacco. William then left VA and migrated to the Quaker community in Salem Co NJ. Perhaps he was a Quaker because later generations were Quakers.

In 1685 and 1689, William was taxed on land in New Jersey. But he also had land in Northampton and he must have acquired an additional 100 acres there because at his death, he owned 150 acres in Northampton Co.

In 1691 in Salem Co, William "Hanbey" and James Bowyer made an inventory of the estate of Andrew Bartleson (Berkelson). On Aug 18 1692, William bought 211 acres on Penn's Neck in Salem Co NJ from William Penn's agent, James Nevill. This land was between John Jacobson and Henry Jeanes.

In Feb 1693, William Hanbey and Paul Jaquatt made the inventory of the estate of Henry Jeanes (Janes). In Nov 1694, William was a witness and an executor for the will of John Scoggin. 

William died in 1702 about age 52. In his will, he gave his eldest son John the home plantation on Penn's Neck NJ; to his sons William, Richard, and Daniel he gave the 150 acres he owned in Northampton Co VA. He also gave his sons some personal possessions: to John, his "biggest gun," 2 pewter dishes, 2 pewter plates, and an iron kettle; to William, a gold ring; to Richard, a bloodstone; to Daniel, a piece of "unicorn horn." William also stated that after his debts were settled, that the rest be divided among his "other children." Jean was the executor and the witnesses were Walter Hughstis, Nat Jeans, and Wooley Nealson.

Since William, in his will, named his sons in the order of John, William, Richard, Daniel, this researcher has placed them in that order with approximate birth years.

In 1667, a William Hanby paid quit rent on 210 acres to Gov. William Penn. That record could not refer to the William Hanby above because he would have only been about 17 years old in 1667 and the William Hanby of this sketch was in Northampton Co VA through 1677. It is believed that the William Hanby of 1667 PA is a different William Hanby.

References
Shourds, Thomas. History and Genealogy of Fenwick's Colony, 1976. p 503,504.
Salem Co NJ Will Bk 3 p 156,157.
The Quaker Yeomen, Jan 1993, page 1.
Bell, John. Northampton County VA Tithables 1662-1677. p 40,47,56,63,69.
Whitelaw, Ralph. Virginia's Eastern Shore. p 205.
Mackey, Howard and Marlene Groves. Northampton County VA Record Book Orders, Deeds, Wills, Etc., Vol 5 1654-1655. p 104.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County Orders & Wills, Vol 1 1683-1689. p 102,118,152.
Nelson, William. Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Part I 1670-1730. p 27, 256, 407.
New Jersey Calendar of Wills 1670-1730. p 204.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist. 3/2002
This narrative is copyrighted material and may not be posted or published except by the author.



Children of RICHARD HANBY and MARY CHILCOTT are:
ii. REBECCA4 HANBY, b. c 1657, Northampton Co VA; d. c Sep 1682, Northampton Co VA; m. SIMON THOMAS, c 1675, VA; b. c 1652; d. Oct 1682, Northampton Co VA.

Notes for REBECCA HANBY:
Rebecca Hanby, a daughter of Richard Hanby and his second wife Mary Chilcott, was born in Northampton County VA. Rebecca's mother died 1660-1665 when Rebecca was a young child. Her father married as his third wife Susannah about 1666. Susannah would have raised Rebecca.
About 1675 at age 18, Rebecca married Simon Thomas. Simon Thomas was a carpenter and builder in Northampton Co VA. He probably built St. George's Church in Accomack Co prior to July 1679. In July 1679, Thomas contracted with the churchwardens of Hungars Parish to build a church for 10,000 pounds of tobacco. Thomas probably could not write because he signed the contract with his mark.
However, by July 1681, Thomas brought suit against the churchwardens for payment. Work had been ordered to be stopped by the governor. Unfortunately, Thomas died in Oct 1682 with the parish owing him money. The church was finished after 1686.
Rebecca and Simon seem to have had only one child, a son named Simon. Perhaps he had been sent to England for education because his father's will indicated that young Simon was not in Virginia.
In his will, dated Oct 4 1682 and probated Oct 30 1682, Simon left his estate to his son "Simon Thomas if he be living in England or elsewhere" and "in case we do not hear from him for 12 years, my land to William Hanby and the remainder to be equally divided by John, Charles, and Joseph Hanby." Rebecca was named in her father's will, dated August 1682, when he left her a cow. However, she was not named in her husband's will dated just two months later. She probably died about September 1682. 

References
Whitelaw, Ralph. Virginia's Eastern Shore. p 388-391.
Marshall, James. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County VA 1632-1802. p 113.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.


iii. ELIZABETH HANBY, b. c 1659, Northampton Co VA; d. Aft. 1716, Isle of Wight Co VA; m. WILLIAM SCOTT, c 1675, VA; b. c 1650; d. 1716, Isle of Wight Co VA.

Notes for ELIZABETH HANBY:
Elizabeth Hanby, a daughter of Richard Hanby and his second wife Mary Chilcott, was born in Northampton County VA. Elizabeth's mother died 1660-1665 when Elizabeth was a young child. Her father married as his third wife Susannah about 1666. Susannah would have raised Elizabeth from childhood.
About 1675 at age 16, Elizabeth married William Scott. When her father died in 1683, she was given a feather bed.
The family lived in Northampton Co VA until at least November 1709. The family moved to Isle of Wight Co VA. No further records have been sought for this family.

References
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1704-1710. p 152.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.




Children of RICHARD HANBY and SUSANNAH are:
iv. DANIEL4 HANBY, b. c 1666, Northampton Co VA; d. Bet. Jan 1708/09 - Feb 1709/10, Northampton Co VA; m. MARY, c 1691, Northampton Co VA; b. c 1671; d. Aft. 1724.

Notes for DANIEL HANBY:
Daniel Hanby was born and grew up in Northampton Co VA. His father died when Daniel was about 16 years old, so he would have had to help his mother run the farm and raise the younger boys. His father left him an equal share of 150 acres with his brothers, to be given to them at their mother's death.

About 1691 at age 25, Daniel married Mary (surname unknown). They had only 2 daughters. 

Daniel Hanby served as a juror in Northampton County VA in Jan 1694 and January 1696. He witnessed the will of Thomas Shepherd which was presented in court in June 1697. At his mother's death in 1697, he received 50 acres. In May 1688, Daniel served as a juror.

He was listed in the 1704 rent rolls for Northampton Co VA with 50 acres. In March 1705, Richard served as a juror. In September 1709, Esther Sanderson was apprenticed to Daniel and Mary Hanby until the age of 16. In November 1709, Daniel was appointed to administer the estate of William Harmanson.

By February 1710, Daniel had died at about age 44. He left a will naming wife Mary, daughters Susannah and Elizabeth, and brother Charles Hanby. Curiously, Daniel and 2 of his brothers all died in 1710. In July 1710, daughter Susannah chose Col. William Waters as her guardian. Both daughters married and widow Mary lived until at least 1724.

References
Wertenbaker, Thomas. The Planters of Colonial Virginia, 1922. p 245.
Crozier. VA County Records, Northampton Co, Vol VI. p 225.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills, Vol 2, 1686-1689. p 108.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills, Vol 2, 1689-1698. p 22, 90, 110, 114.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1704-1710. p 24, 143, 152, 157, 173.
Marshall, James H. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton Co VA 1632-1802. p 115, 193.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.


v. RICHARD HANBY, b. c 1669, Northampton Co VA; d. c Sep 1710, Northampton Co VA; m. SARAH, c 1693, prob VA; b. c 1673; d. Aft. 1729, prob Northampton Co VA.

Notes for RICHARD HANBY:
Richard Hanby, a son of Richard Hanby and his third wife Susannah, was born and grew up in Northampton County VA. His father died in 1683 when young Richard was about 13 years old, so he would have had to help his mother run the farm and raise the younger boys. His father left him an equal share of 150 acres with his brothers, to be given to them at their mother's death. 
About 1693 at age 24, Richard married Sarah (surname unknown). They had only 1 daughter. Richard witnessed the will of Thomas Shepherd which was presented in court in June 1697.
When his mother died in 1697, Richard inherited 50 acres. Richard was listed in the 1704 rent rolls of Northampton Co VA with 75 acres. In December 1705, Richard was paid 200 pounds of tobacco for a wolf's head.
In 1710, Richard died about age 42. He left a will naming wife Sarah, daughter Sarah, and brothers Daniel and Charles. He also stated that "if Sarah [daughter] should die under 14, then her legacies to Pale Fabin's 3 children." He left his brothers Daniel and Charles to oversee his will. Curiously, Richard and two of his brothers all died in 1710. Probably daughter Sarah died young since no further record has been found of her.
In September 1710, widow Sarah appeared in court and declared that she "does deliver up all her right and title of the lands in questions to John Hanby except her thirds or right of dower of the said lands in questions which she is now in possession of." It appears that after the death of her husband, the land reverted to the Hanby family.
In 1720, Sarah was a witness to the will of William Jacob, a kinsman (Marshall, 236).
In 1727, Sarah Hanby was mentioned in the estate of William Hallett. Widow Sarah continued to appear in the tithe lists through 1729.

References
Wertenbacker, Thomas. The Planters of Colonial Virginia, 1922. p 245.
Crozier. VA County Records, Northampton Co, Vol VI. p 225.
Marshall, James H. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton Co VA 1632-1802. p 193-194, 235.
Bell, John B. Northampton County VA Tithable Lists 1720-1769. p 36, 203.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County VA Orders & Wills Vol 2, 1694-1698. p 114.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1704-1710. p 36, 164, 175.
Mihalyka, Jean. Loose Papers and Sundry Court Cases 1732-1744/5, Northampton County VA, Vol. 2. p 146.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.



More About RICHARD HANBY:
Fact 14: Will, Marshall p184

vi. JOHN HANBY, b. c 1672, Northampton Co VA; d. 1719, Northampton Co VA; m. MARY MULLS, c 1695, Northampton Co VA; b. c 1675; d. Bef. 1719, Northampton Co VA.

Notes for JOHN HANBY:
John Hanby was born and grew up in Northampton County VA. In May 1678 about age 6, his cattlemark was registered with the court, "the right ear cropt and one slit and underbitten, the left ear cropt and two slits." His father died when John was about 11 years old, so he would have had to help his mother run the farm.

There is one intriguing record of a John Hanby in the Northampton Co VA records. In Order Bk 13 p 343, there is the following record: "the deposition of John Hanby aged 23 years or thereabouts, being examined and sworn, saith that this deponant did see Thomas Pettitt help to make a ware on his mother's land and set a ware in a gut or branch on the land of Captain William Kendall in this county called Ten Pound branch on or about 24th of September last past, and after the setting, the same did with others fish the said ware and had his part of the fish so caught and further this deponant saith not." 

About 1695 at age 23, John married Mary Mulls. They had only 3 children. At his mother's death in 1697, John received his 50 acres inheritance from his father.
John left a variety of court records. In January 1697, John was a juror at court. In May 1699, he was a grand juror. In January 1700, John "Hamby" appraised the estate of Peter Delacourt. In Dec 1701, John won a judgement against Michael Cormick for 400 pounds of tobacco. In March 1702, Hanby was summoned to court for failing to appear for jury duty. Hanby responded to this charge by paying a fine. In Aug 1703, Hanby served on a jury. In January 1704, John proved the will of Mary Pettit. John was listed in the 1704 rent rolls of Northampton Co VA with 150 acres. In July 1705, John was named with William Harmanson to advise the widow of Paul Fabin (Phabin).

In May 1710, James North brought a suit against John South for land which John Hanby had devised to James North. Mary Hanby was ordered to court to make the title clear. However, proper documents were not served on Mary, so a "nonsuit" was declared for the defendant by the court.

John died in 1719 about age 49, leaving only 3 children. In his will, John "Hamby" named his 3 children and two grandchildren. Abstract of will: to my son William, my 100 acres whereon I now live, and for want of heirs to my grandson Richard Jacob. To my daughter Ellener Jacob during her life my land I formerly lived on. To [daughter] Ann Holt during her life my bridle and saddle and then to her daughter Mary Holt. To Richard Thorman; to Michael Cormick; to my brother Charles. Son William residual legatee and executor. Witnesses Thomas Harmanson, Richard Thorman, William Batson. John signed with the letter H. (Marshall, 222)

His son William died without issue a year later about age 22. In his will, William named his aunt Elizabeth Hanby (widow of Charles Hanby), his aunt Mary Hanby (probably the widow of Daniel Hanby), his sister Ellenor Jacob, and other relatives. (Marshall, 236)

References
Walczyk, Frank. Cattle Marks of Northampton Co VA 1655-1742. p 15.
Whitelaw, Ralph. Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1989. p 201, 205.
Wertenbaker, Thomas. The Planters of Colonial Virginia, 1922. p 245.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1689-1698. p 48, 53, 128.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1698-1703. p 7, 47, 61, 62, 71, 77, 78, 79, 124.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1704-1710. p 16, 32, 170, 173, 175.
Marshall, James H. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton Co VA 1632-1802.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.
This narrative is copyrighted material and may not be posted or published except by the author.


vii. CHARLES HANBY, b. c 1674, Northampton Co VA; d. Apr 1720, Northampton Co VA; m. ELIZABETH, c 1700, prob VA; d. Aft. 1727.

Notes for CHARLES HANBY:
Charles Hanby was born and grew up in Northampton Co VA. In May 1678 about age 4, Charles had his cattlemark registered, "the right ear cropt and one slit, cropt on the left ear, two slits and one overbitten." His father died when Charles was about 8 years old, so he would have had to help his mother on the farm. He was not named in his father's will.

Charles married Elizabeth (surname unknown) and they had some children.

Charles was listed in the 1704 rent rolls of Northampton Co VA with 25 acres.

Charles died in 1720 about age 48. Charles left a nuncupative (unwritten) will leaving his entire estate "to my wife to bring up my children." The witnesses were all relatives: William Hanby, Andrew John Fabin, and Barbara Batson. Widow Elizabeth presented the "will" to the probate court. Since he indicated that his children were under age, he probably married after 1700.
At his death, Charles was the last of the 5 Hanby brothers who were sons of Richard Hanby and his third wife Susannah.

In May 1720, widow Elizabeth was named in the will of John Robins. Eizabeth appeared in the tithe lists for 1724, 1725, and 1726. [haven't checked further yet] Listed with her in 1724 and 1727 was Richard Hanby, probably her son.

References
Walczyk, Frank. Cattle Marks of Northampton Co VA 1655-1742. p 11.
Wertenbaker, Thomas. The Planters of Colonial Virginia, 1922. p 245.
Marshall, James H. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton Co VA 1632-1802. p 233, 234.
Bell, John B. Northampton Co VA Tithes 1720-1769. Heritage Books, 1993. p 24, 51, 67, 75, 119.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1704-1710. p 156.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.
This narrative is copyrighted material and may not be posted or published except by the author.



viii. JOSEPH HANBY, b. c 1676, Northampton Co VA; d. c Mar 1709/10, Northampton Co VA; m. MARY, c 1700, Northampton Co VA; d. Aft. Mar 1709/10.

Notes for JOSEPH HANBY:
Joseph Hanby was born and grew up in Northampton Co VA. His father died in 1683 when Joseph was about 6 years old. His father did not name Joseph in his will. In 1686, Joseph was a legatee in the will of Henry Marshman and received a lamb.
Joseph married Mary (surname unknown) and they had some children.
In April 1703, Joseph was given his father's cattlemark (which was registered in Nov 1667) by his mother, "the right ear only slit, the left ear cropt, one slit, a hole in it." Joseph Hanby is not listed in the 1704 quit rent rolls.
Joseph died in 1710 about age 36. He did not leave a will, but his widow was granted administration of his estate. The appraisers were Charles Hanby and 3 others. Strangely, Joseph and 2 of his brothers all died in 1710.
Unfortunately, Joseph did not name his "children," however it may be assumed that his son was John because a John Hanby appears in the tithe lists beginning in 1725. In 1725, John was listed with Teage Odeare. In 1729, he was with Darmon Loughley (Loughland).

References
Marshall, James H. Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton Co VA 1632-1802. p 181.
Walczyk, Frank. Cattle Marks of Northampton Co VA 1655-1742. p 27.
Bell, John B. Northampton Co VA Tithes 1720-1769. Heritage Books, 1993. p 83, 176, 203, 218.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1683-1689 Vol 2 1686-1689. p 41.
Walczyk, Frank. Northampton County, VA Orders & Wills 1704-1710. p 156, 164.
This was researched and written by Ann Blomquist.
This narrative is copyrighted material and may not be posted or published except by the author.

2004 by Ann Blomquist.

Page added January 14, 2004

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